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Pakistan's Premier News Translation Agency

Peru enforces curfew after violent protests

After at least 17 people were killed during anti-government protests in Southern Peru, the UN and Amnesty International demanded an investigation.

Lima, 13 January 2023 (GNP):  After at least 17 people were killed in clashes between anti-government protestors and security forces in the southern region of Puno, the Peruvian administration issued a nighttime curfew to try to calm things down. The curfew, which Prime Minister of Peru, Alberto Otarola announced on 10 January, Tuesday, will last three days and be in effect from 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m. local time (01:00-09:00 GMT).

It took place amid ongoing anti-Puno government demonstrations. President Dina Boluarte was nominated by Congress in early December after Pedro Castillo was dismissed and detained.

The protesters have demanded Boluarte’s resignation, early elections, and Castillo’s release. Castillo is serving an 18-month pre-trial jail sentence on allegations of conspiracy and rebellion, which he denies.

On December 7, shortly after he declared plans to temporarily dissolve Congress and rule by executive order to “re-establish the rule of law and democracy,” lawmakers decided to impeach the former president.

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Boluarte, Castillo’s vice president at the time, and other detractors described the action as a coup attempt.

Castillo, a left-leaning ex-rural teacher, endured many accusations of corruption and political confrontations with Peru’s opposition-dominated Congress during his brief term as president.
His rural strongholds, where locals claim they have been ignored for years, have seen many rallies after his removal.

Following the killings in the south of the nation on Tuesday, Amnesty International asked Peruvian authorities to stop using unnecessary and disproportionate force on civilians.

The problem is getting worse, according to Marina Navarro, executive director of Amnesty International Peru, because of official repression against protesters and the deaths of people.

The authorities were urged once more to uphold human rights to the fullest extent possible. International laws governing the use of force must be adhered to by security forces. The cost of the nation’s current political dilemma shouldn’t fall on the people.

Although the precise circumstances that caused the killings are still unknown, according to Peruvian authorities, most of the bloodshed occurred when demonstrators attempted to attack the airport in Juliaca, which was being protected by security personnel.

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There were fourteen fatalities, and many of them had gunshot wounds, according to a Juliaca hospital official, as stated by the AFP news agency.

The interior ministry reported that a police officer also perished when unknown persons in Juliaca set fire to his car early on Tuesday morning. Senior ministry official Jorge Angulo told local media that investigators were looking for more information about the attack.

He was practically roasted to death, according to Angulo, who spoke to a local broadcaster Canal N. At this time, an autopsy is being undertaken to fully define the form and circumstances in which he was injured.

The interior ministry reported that a police officer also perished when unknown persons in Juliaca set fire to his car early on Tuesday morning. Senior ministry official Jorge Angulo told local media that investigators were looking for more information about the attack.

According to sources, an autopsy is currently being done to determine exactly how and why he was hurt—pretty much burned to death, and under what conditions.

Marta Hurtado, a spokeswoman for the UN Office for the Protection of Human Rights, urged Peru's government to conduct timely, impartial, and effective investigations into the fatalities and injuries, calling those responsible to account and ensuring victims obtain access to justice and redress.

In an effort to quell the turmoil, Boluarte’s administration announced a national state of emergency last month, banning freedom of movement and assembly. The Peruvian government has stated that while it respects the right to protest, it also has a duty to defend the people from dangerous protesters.

Last week, Boluarte cited delays, agony, and economic losses, as a result of the protests and encouraged peace, quiet, and solidarity to support the development of the motherland.

 

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